Nobody goes up to the Kelimutu crater lakes for sunset. But I didn’t let that stop me. I figured I’d drive up, and see what I could see.

When I got to the gate, a ranger informed me the park would close soon at 6 pm. Why so early? I explained that I wanted to photograph the sunset. He let me in, and said to be out by 6:30.

When I got to the viewpoint, there was a big group of Indonesians. There were also soldiers in impressive uniforms standing guard.

Among the clouds.
Among the clouds.

One of the visitors approached me and asked if he could have his picture with me. He explained that they were Indonesian Navy SEALS with their families. Even at this most famous of sites, I was still an attraction.

It was very cloudy. But the clouds created some interesting effects as the sun went down. I though it was worth a trip up. After all, there is nothing to do in the tiny town of Moni.

The third lake was not interesting for the sunrise, but was the star now.
The third lake was not interesting for the sunrise, but was the star now.
Clouds on Kelimutu.
Clouds on Kelimutu.
The main lake looked different in the sunset light.
The main lake looked different in the sunset light.
Above the clouds.
Above the clouds.
The drive back to Moni was nice too.
The drive back to Moni was nice too.
Terry
I'm Terry, former cubicle-dweller, and now traveler, photographer, writer, and entrepreneur. I quit my job in 2014 to travel to US national parks, then to South East Asia. I write about independent, flexible, long-term, budget travel. Sign up to my newsletter to get the latest news on what I'm up to. I hope you join me on my trek around the world.

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